Vocal Booth Acoustics

Vocal Booth Acoustics

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Vocal Booth Acoustics

If your goal is to design a vocal booth or isolation room for recording instruments you’ll need to keep outside noise from polluting the sound quality of the recording. You need to make sure that the room does not introduce any anomalies to the voice or an instrument.

A vocal booth is generally a smaller room designed to accommodate one to two people.

An isolation room needs to be large enough to house a drum kit, guitar amp and so on. Vocal booths can come in all different shapes and sizes, and these factors will determine the best sound solutions for the room that you will be recording in. Most vocal booths are about 3′ x 4′ to 4′ x 6′ in size. (40cm x 50cm to 50cm x 80cm)

If you are building a vocal booth from scratch, it can be expensive. 

For those looking to control the sound in their vocal booths, we know how important it is to find the most effective solution, and the best sound control products at an affordable price. 


Here are a few tips to keep in mind

Where should I place my sound treatments?

Unlike rooms being treated for live instruments, a vocal booth has one purpose: recording solo vocals. For this reason, the placement of your sound panels is more about total coverage and effectiveness than strategic placement. It is common for people to assume that vocal booths should have 100% of their walls and ceilings covered with acoustic material. We have found that 50-80% is the best practice, depending on the type of booth.

How much coverage do I need in my Vocal Booth?

What you’ll use the booth for is one of the main factors to take into account when determining the amount of acoustic treatments you will need. If your going to be using the booth to record vocals or voice overs, we recommend at least 50% coverage. This will keep your recording with clean and crisp sound quality without leaving the room sounding “dead”. 

In a smaller space like a vocal booth you will need to add acoustic treatment to the upper corners and the ceiling. 

How much coverage do I need in my Isolation Booth?

If you’re building an isolation room for recording guitar, your going to need to treat for a broader band of frequencies. Like other rooms, it’s always best to start your treatment at waist height and continue up to above the ears. 

If your goal is to design a vocal booth or isolation room for recording instruments you’ll need to keep outside noise from polluting the sound quality of the recording. You need to make sure that the room does not introduce any anomalies to the voice or an instrument.

A vocal booth is generally a smaller room designed to accommodate one to two people.

An isolation room needs to be large enough to house a drum kit, guitar amp and so on. Vocal booths can come in all different shapes and sizes, and these factors will determine the best sound solutions for the room that you will be recording in. Most vocal booths are about 3′ x 4′ to 4′ x 6′ in size. (40cm x 50cm to 50cm x 80cm)

If you are building a vocal booth from scratch, it can be expensive. 

For those looking to control the sound in their vocal booths, we know how important it is to find the most effective solution, and the best sound control products at an affordable price. 


Here are a few tips to keep in mind

Where should I place my sound treatments?

Unlike rooms being treated for live instruments, a vocal booth has one purpose: recording solo vocals. For this reason, the placement of your sound panels is more about total coverage and effectiveness than strategic placement. It is common for people to assume that vocal booths should have 100% of their walls and ceilings covered with acoustic material. We have found that 50-80% is the best practice, depending on the type of booth.

How much coverage do I need in my Vocal Booth?

What you’ll use the booth for is one of the main factors to take into account when determining the amount of acoustic treatments you will need. If your going to be using the booth to record vocals or voice overs, we recommend at least 50% coverage. This will keep your recording with clean and crisp sound quality without leaving the room sounding “dead”. 

In a smaller space like a vocal booth you will need to add acoustic treatment to the upper corners and the ceiling. 

How much coverage do I need in my Isolation Booth?

If you’re building an isolation room for recording guitar, your going to need to treat for a broader band of frequencies. Like other rooms, it’s always best to start your treatment at waist height and continue up to above the ears. 

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